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Pupil Premium

DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS

Pupil premium strategy statement

This statement details our school’s use of pupil premium (and recovery premium for the 2021 to 2022 academic year) funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils.

It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of pupil premium had within our school.

School overview

Detail

Data

School name

Barnwell School

Number of pupils in school

1168 (1030 7-11)

Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils

30% (312 7-11)

Sixth Form TBC

Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers

2021-2022

2022-2023

2023-2024

Date this statement was published

December 2021

Date on which it will be reviewed

September 2022

Statement authorised by

 

Pupil premium lead

Miss Maria Townsend

Governor / Trustee lead

Mrs Mary Patrick

Funding overview

Detail

Amount

Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year

£306,850

Recovery premium funding allocation this financial year

£22,185

Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable)

£ 0

Total budget for this academic year

If your school is an academy in a trust that pools this funding, state the amount available to your school this academic year

£ 329,035

 

 

Part A: Pupil premium strategy plan

Statement of intent

At Barnwell we work on the principle that there is no such thing as a typical pupil premium student and therefore our strategy is centred around meeting individual needs.

Our overall aims are:

  • To raise the aspiration and ambition of disadvantaged students and to ensure that they have equitable access to all school experiences.
  • To ensure all disadvantaged students benefit from quality first teaching where planning considers their individual learning needs including barriers to learning.
  • To utilise targeted interventions and support, in all subjects, facilitating high quality education provision for disadvantaged students.
  • To remove non-academic barriers including attendance, behaviour and wellbeing to support the success of disadvantaged students.
  • To improve the progress and outcomes of disadvantaged students and eliminate the gaps between their progress and outcomes and that of their more affluent peers.
  • To improve the reading fluency, comprehension, and vocabulary of disadvantaged students.
  • To improve the mental health and well-being of disadvantaged students.

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils.

Challenge number

Detail of challenge

1

Low literacy levels and gaps in students reading age when compared with their expected reading age

2

Low levels of parental engagement and limited or no boundaries at home resulting in low student engagement, low aspirations, lack of homework and non-conducive out of school learning environments

3

Low attendance/high levels of PA

4

Poor mental health and wellbeing

Intended outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome

Success criteria

Elimination of the gap between progress made and outcomes achieved by disadvantaged and other students.

Progress and attainment 8 scores are equally strong for those eligible for PP and their peers.

English and Maths 4+ and 5+ measures are equally strong for those eligible for PP and their peers

Destinations data shows an increase in the number of disadvantaged students progressing onto level 3 courses to bring it in line with their non-disadvantaged Barnwell peers.  

 

Equitable access to school experiences

Trips and visits logs/registers shows that uptake is at least as strong for students eligible for PP as for their more advantaged peers

Extra-curricular activities register shows that uptake is at least as strong for students eligible for PP as for their more advantaged peers

Successful engagement of families or additional supportive arrangements in place for those students whose parents/carers will not engage.

Improvement in attendance and outcomes of identified students.

Improved attendance to parental meetings, information evenings, parents’ evenings, and options evenings. A family member for every student eligible for PP will have attended at least one parent meeting (f2f or online) each year.

 

Improvement in overall attendance of PP students and a reduction in the PA of disadvantaged students

Attendance data – overall attendance 95% and PA matches that of all students.

Year 1 18%

Year 2 16%

Year 3 13%

A reduction in the number of disadvantaged students who have a reading age below the expected.

Data comparison of reading age from September to July.

The average reading age for those eligible for PP will be at their chronological age by the end of year 9.

An improvement in the mental health of disadvantaged students.

Number of referrals to external services for PP students to be in line with their non-disadvantaged peers.

Number of exits cards for PP students to be in line with their non-disadvantaged peers.

Attendance to school and lessons of PP students to be in line with their non-disadvantaged peers.

Number of lesson withdrawals for PP students to be in line with their non-disadvantaged peers.

All disadvantaged students have access to a device & Wi-Fi out of school or a place to study in school.

A reduction in the number of non-homework submissions for disadvantaged students.

Activity in this academic year

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.


Teaching (for example, CPD, recruitment and retention)

Budgeted cost: £77,321

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Professional development of staff.

Provide training for all staff on strategies that are effective in improving the literacy levels of students.

 

Quality First teaching

Education Endowment Foundation (2019). The EEF Guide to the Pupil Premium. Available at:

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/evidence-summaries/pupil-premiumguide

 

Education Endowment Foundation (2020b). The EEF Guide to Supporting School Planning: A

Tiered Approach to 2021. Available at: https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/

covid-19-resources/guide-to-supporting-schools-planning

 

Hart, B. and Risley, T. (2003). ‘The early catastrophe: the 30 million word gap by age 3’,

American Educator (spring): 4–9. Available at: https://www.aft.org/sites/default/files/

periodicals/TheEarlyCatastrophe.pdf.

1 and 3

Lead Practitioner role – vulnerable students

Provide staff with training on a range of inclusion strategies to meet the varying needs of disadvantaged students.

 

Farthing, R. (2014). The Costs of Going to School, from Young People’s Perspectives (London:

Child Poverty Action Group). Available at: https://cpag.org.uk/sites/default/files/The%20

Costs%20of%20Going%20to%20School%20FINAL.pdf

Baars, S., Shaw, B., Mulcahy E. and Menzies, L. (2018). School Cultures and Practices:

Supporting the Attainment of Disadvantaged Pupils – a Qualitative Comparison of

London and Non-London Schools. Research Report (May). Available at: https://assets.

publishing. service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/ attachment_data/

file/730628/London_Effect_Qual_Research_-_Research_Report_FINAL_v2.pdf.

Berlinger, W. and Eyre, D. (2017). Great Minds and How to Grow Them (Abingdon and New

York: Routledge).

 

1 and 3

PP lead

Raise awareness of school’s disadvantaged students and provide staff with research-based techniques to meet the needs disadvantaged students.

 

                

 

Farthing, R. (2014). The Costs of Going to School, from Young People’s Perspectives (London:

Child Poverty Action Group). Available at: https://cpag.org.uk/sites/default/files/The%20

Costs%20of%20Going%20to%20School%20FINAL.pdf

Baars, S., Shaw, B., Mulcahy E. and Menzies, L. (2018). School Cultures and Practices:

Supporting the Attainment of Disadvantaged Pupils – a Qualitative Comparison of

London and Non-London Schools. Research Report (May). Available at: https://assets.

publishing. service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/ attachment_data/

file/730628/London_Effect_Qual_Research_-_Research_Report_FINAL_v2.pdf.

 

Berlinger, W. and Eyre, D. (2017). Great Minds and How to Grow Them (Abingdon and New

York: Routledge).

 

1, 2 , 3 & 4

Professional development of staff.

Classroom strategies to support the engagement of disadvantaged students.

 

 

Farthing, R. (2014). The Costs of Going to School, from Young People’s Perspectives (London:

Child Poverty Action Group). Available at: https://cpag.org.uk/sites/default/files/The%20

Costs%20of%20Going%20to%20School%20FINAL.pdf

Baars, S., Shaw, B., Mulcahy E. and Menzies, L. (2018). School Cultures and Practices:

Supporting the Attainment of Disadvantaged Pupils – a Qualitative Comparison of

London and Non-London Schools. Research Report (May). Available at: https://assets.

publishing. service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/ attachment_data/

file/730628/London_Effect_Qual_Research_-_Research_Report_FINAL_v2.pdf.

 

Berlinger, W. and Eyre, D. (2017). Great Minds and How to Grow Them (Abingdon and New

York: Routledge).

 

2

Curriculum trips and visits. Subsidise PP learners for curriculum related visits. Consider amount of funding on a case by case basis. 

Edkins, L. (2019). ‘How to “poverty proof” your school’, TES (25 October). Available at:

https://www.tes.com/magazine/article/how-poverty-proof-your-school.

 

2 and 3

Recruitment of KS2 English teachers to aid the transition of disadvantaged students.

 

 

Rice, F., Frederickson, N., Shelton, K., McManus, C., Riglin, L. and Ng-Knight, T. (2018).

Identifying Factors That Predict Successful and Difficult Transitions to Secondary School

(London: Nuffield Foundation). Available at: https://www.nuffieldfoundation.org/sites/

default/files/files/STARS_report.pdf.

 

1 and 3

Library lessons to support reading fluency and to improve the reading ages of those disadvantaged students who are below expected.

Hart, B. and Risley, T. (2003). ‘The early catastrophe: the 30 million word gap by age 3’,

American Educator (spring): 4–9. Available at: https://www.aft.org/sites/default/files/

periodicals/TheEarlyCatastrophe.pdf.

1

Appointment of literacy leads.

Hart, B. and Risley, T. (2003). ‘The early catastrophe: the 30 million word gap by age 3’,

American Educator (spring): 4–9. Available at: https://www.aft.org/sites/default/files/

periodicals/TheEarlyCatastrophe.pdf.

1

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Budgeted cost: £137,616

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Tutoring

Small group or one to one tutoring using a National Tutoring partner to support catch up.

Education Endowment Foundation (2019). The EEF Guide to the Pupil Premium. Available at:

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/evidence-summaries/pupil-premiumguide

Sobel, D. (2018). Narrowing the Attainment Gap: A Handbook for Schools (London:

Bloomsbury).

Small group tuition teaching strategy from the EEF teacher toolkit. “The average impact of the small group tuition is four additional months’ progress, on average, over the course of a year. Evidence shows that small group tuition is effective and, as a rule of thumb, the smaller the group the better.”

1 and 2

Holiday boosters to support improvements in the outcomes of disadvantaged students.

 

Education Endowment Foundation (2019). The EEF Guide to the Pupil Premium. Available at:

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/evidence-summaries/pupil-premiumguide

Sobel, D. (2018). Narrowing the Attainment Gap: A Handbook for Schools (London:

Bloomsbury).

2

KS3 English Intervention to increase the number of disadvantaged students working in line with their target grade from data track 1 to 3.

Education Endowment Foundation (2019). The EEF Guide to the Pupil Premium. Available at:

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/evidence-summaries/pupil-premiumguide

Sobel, D. (2018). Narrowing the Attainment Gap: A Handbook for Schools (London:

Bloomsbury).

Small group tuition teaching strategy from the EEF teacher toolkit. “The average impact of the small group tuition is four additional months’ progress, on average, over the course of a year. Evidence shows that small group tuition is effective and, as a rule of thumb, the smaller the group the better.”

1 and 3

KS3 Maths Intervention

Intervention to increase the number of disadvantaged students working in line with their target grade in maths from data track 1 to 3.

Education Endowment Foundation (2019). The EEF Guide to the Pupil Premium. Available at:

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/evidence-summaries/pupil-premiumguide

Sobel, D. (2018). Narrowing the Attainment Gap: A Handbook for Schools (London:

Bloomsbury).

Small group tuition teaching strategy from the EEF teacher toolkit. “The average impact of the small group tuition is four additional months’ progress, on average, over the course of a year. Evidence shows that small group tuition is effective and, as a rule of thumb, the smaller the group the better.”

1 and 3

KS4 Maths Intervention

Intervention to increase the number of disadvantaged students working in line with their target grade from data track 1 to 4.

Education Endowment Foundation (2019). The EEF Guide to the Pupil Premium. Available at:

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/evidence-summaries/pupil-premiumguide

Sobel, D. (2018). Narrowing the Attainment Gap: A Handbook for Schools (London:

Bloomsbury).

Small group tuition teaching strategy from the EEF teacher toolkit. “The average impact of the small group tuition is four additional months’ progress, on average, over the course of a year. Evidence shows that small group tuition is effective and, as a rule of thumb, the smaller the group the better.”

1 and 3

Year group read

Invest in 2-3 texts per academic year to ensure all disadvantaged students have access to a copy.

Education Endowment Foundation (2019). The EEF Guide to the Pupil Premium. Available at:

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/evidence-summaries/pupil-premiumguide

Sobel, D. (2018). Narrowing the Attainment Gap: A Handbook for Schools (London:

Bloomsbury).

 

1

PRIDE Hub

To support the well-being of disadvantaged students.

Improving mental health raises self-esteem, self-confidence and leads to improved attendance and outcomes for learners.

2, 3 and 4

Book Trust

To ensure all year 7 students own at least one book of their own.

 

Reading is a key determiner for academic success. Closing the reading gap leads to improved confidence, engagement and greater outcomes.

1

One-to-one reading to improve reading fluency and reduce the number of students with a reading age below expected.

Quigley, A. and Coleman, R. (2020). Improving Literacy in Secondary Schools: Guidance

Report (London: Education Endowment Foundation). Available at: https://

educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/tools/guidance-reports/improving-literacy-insecondary-

schools.

1

Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Budgeted cost: £114,098

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Attendance lead to carry out targeted work with individual students and families to improve their attendance to school. This includes attendance clinics.

Education Endowment Foundation (2019). The EEF Guide to the Pupil Premium. Available at:

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/evidence-summaries/pupil-premiumguide

EEF toolkit +3

 

“Interventions may well be one part of an effective Pupil Premium Strategy, they are likely to be most effective when deployed alongside efforts to attend to 7 11 Heads of House and Tutors monitor and support the attendance, engagement and readiness to learn of PP pupils, (£4,920) wider barriers to learning, such as attendance and behaviour.”

3

Student wellbeing lead to work with targeted students and families to identify and remove non-academic barriers to learning.

Goodall, J. (2017a). Narrowing the Achievement Gap: Parental Engagement with Children’s

Learning (Abingdon and New York: Routledge).

Goodall, J. (2017b). Report on the Pilot of a Toolkit for Parental Engagement: From Project to

Process (Bath: University of Bath). Available at: http://oga4schoolgovernors.org.uk/

wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Report-on-the-Pilot-of-a-Toolkit-for-Parental-Engagement

EEF toolkit +3

2, 3 and 4

Learning mentor to provide one-to-one support to targeted students and their families to remove non-academicbarriers to learning.

Pierson, R. (2013). ‘Every kid needs a champion’ [video], TED.com (3 May). Available at:

https://www.ted.com/talks/rita_pierson_every_kid_needs_a_champion.

 

EEF toolkit +3

 

 

2, 3 and 4

Uniform. Purchase a bank of new uniform items in a wide range of sizes for loan or donation to families as needed.

NASUWT (2014). The Cost of Education (Birmingham: NASUWT). Available at: http://www.

conservativehome.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Cost-of-Education-2014-BIGSPEECH-

BUBBLE-1.pdf.

 

2, 3 and 4

Breakfast

Purchase bagels and breakfast bars to students who arrive to school without eating.

NASUWT (2014). The Cost of Education (Birmingham: NASUWT). Available at: http://www.

conservativehome.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Cost-of-Education-2014-BIGSPEECH-

BUBBLE-1.pdf.

 

4

Counselling to support the well-being and mental health of targeted students.

Improving mental health raises self-esteem, self-confidence and leads to improved attendance and outcomes for learners.

2,3 and 4

Equipment. To ensure equity in terms of curriculum resources for specific subjects such as Art, Food Technology and Graphics.

Spencer, S. (2015). The Cost of the School Day (Glasgow: Child Poverty Action Group).

Available at: https://cpag.org.uk/sites/default/files/CPAG-Scot-Cost-Of-School-Day-

Report(Oct15)_0.pdf.

 

2

Transport to fund the collection of and drop off of disadvantaged students to school and other provisions.

Spencer, S. (2015). The Cost of the School Day (Glasgow: Child Poverty Action Group).

Available at: https://cpag.org.uk/sites/default/files/CPAG-Scot-Cost-Of-School-Day-

Report(Oct15)_0.pdf.

 

3

Trips and visits to ensure disadvantaged students have equitable access.

Extracurricular activities are important in developing soft (especially social) skills as well as being associated with a range of other positive outcomes. An unequal playing field. Social Mobility Commission research.

3 and 4

Alternative provision

To support the engagement and attendance of the most challenging, disengaged disadvantaged students.

 

Meeting individual needs

2, 3 and 4

Total budgeted cost: £329,035

Part B: Review of outcomes in the previous academic year

Pupil premium strategy outcomes

This details the impact that our pupil premium activity had on pupils in the 2020 to 2021 academic year.

The strategy was centred on raising aspirations and expectations, improving behaviour for learning, meeting individual needs with a focus on inclusion plans and improving attendance through a reduction in fixed term exclusions.

There was a significant reduction in the number of fixed term exclusions. 184 down to 27.

There was a significant improvement in terms of behaviour for learning as indicated by classroom concerns.

There was a significant reduction in non-academic barriers (uniform items supplied throughout the academic year, breakfast provided in the form of bagels, mental health and wellbeing support accessed through a range of services including Safe Space).

Covid-19 disproportionately impacted on disadvantaged students at Barnwell and this is the case nationally.  Destinations data demonstrates that the vast majority of our disadvantaged students went on to destinations that matched their interests and aspirations including students with SEND.

This year we are upping the ante in terms of aspirations and expectations and focusing heavily on meeting individual needs through quality first teaching and targeted non-academic support to improve attendance, well-being, and outcomes.

Externally provided programmes

Please include the names of any non-DfE programmes that you purchased in the previous academic year. This will help the Department for Education identify which ones are popular in England

Programme

Provider

N/A

 

 

 

Service pupil premium funding (optional)

For schools that receive this funding, you may wish to provide the following information:

Measure

Details

How did you spend your service pupil premium allocation last academic year?

N/A

What was the impact of that spending on service pupil premium eligible pupils?

N/A

Further information (optional)

N/A

 

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